90-9-1

According to Jakob Nielson Participation Inequity: Encouraging More Users to Contribute there is a 90-9-1 rule for online participation: 90% are lurkers, 9% are intermittent contributors, and 1% are heavy contributors. On the flip side 90% of posts came from 1% of users, 10% of posts came from 9%, and 90% never post. He then goes on to show in charity on Facebook less than 1% give donations. He gives some suggestions for overcoming this disparity but I think his first statement is most true: you can’t.

I think this is true is any organization and on-line is no different. There will always be lots of people who just “show up” compared to the few who do the lion’s share of the work. So relating this back to education, I do not know any research into this but I would be willing to guess that around 1% of educators are involved in on-line communities such blogs, Twitter, Plurk, Nings, etc. There is often talk on-line about how to get more teachers involved in the learning and sharing that takes place in these kind of spaces.

Based on this article I wonder if we are fighting a losing battle to get a large number of educators to be involved in on-line learning. It would be great if we could get 90% of teachers to even lurk in on-line communities, but even that seems unlikely.

I am not saying that we should stop trying to encourage people to get involved in these kinds of spaces, but I do wonder if we at some point accept it as fact that many teachers will never choose to participate in on-line learning activities and instead focus on having a “go to” person per building who is active on-line and can be a resource to other teachers. I know this could be looked at as enabling the lazy, but I think it is utopian to think that someday all teachers will be involved in on-line communities and sharing.

So what do you think? Do you have a plan to get all teachers active in on-line learning or should we consider alternate methods to share our learning such as “building experts”?

This post is part of EdTech Blog Swap and was written by guest blogger Michael Kaechele (concretekax on Twitter) who blogs at the Concrete Classroom.

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Keep track of Friends Over Multiple Services with Ease

With the growth of social media most users have multiple accounts and services they monitor with friends in each of these services.  Often it is hard to keep track of what friends are saying across multiple services and sharing with friends across these services can be just as difficult.  Well nsyght might be a way for you to aggregate these services and easily share and post to multiple services at one time.   This site will allow to search what your friends are saying, allow you to discuss topics with them on their network and post to other services all in one location.

This is a great resource for educators creating Professional Learning Networks (PLN).  You can monitor multiple networks and follow or discuss different topics and themes over a variety of social media websites.

Take a look at this resource at the following address: http://nsyght.com/

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Want to simplify your online presence?

Want to simplify your online presence?   Flavors.me might just be the key.  This site allows you to create content and then publish it to a variety of different sites and services.   This site allows you to post content to multiple sites at one time saving you time in getting your message out to your multiple online profiles.  For an excellent over view of what you can do on this site watch the video below.

Flavors.me from Jack Zerby on Vimeo.

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Privacy Settings that Allow Teachers to Separate Professional and Personal Life on Facebook

With all of the concern and talk about teachers and Facebook this is a great resource for all teachers.  This will help keep things secure and private so students and others can not see personal information about you.  These setting are very effective and are worth spending some time to learn.  Being able to effectively  set  these privacy settings in Facebook can not only protect your privacy but allow you to separate your personal and professional life.  A must for all teachers to remain sane and effective teachers. Check out the link below!

Click Here: 10 New Privacy Settings Every Facebook User Should Know.

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Social Networking hits the Radio with Jelli

Here is a site that fascinated me over the weekend.  Social networking and democracy decide what music is played on this site. Once you log on you can go to a particular station and vote in real time with other users and decide what song to play next.  I found this interesting because for me listening to the radio is a way to relax.  The concept of voting and lobbying for your song to play next seems like to much work.   This is a great example though of just how embedded social media has become and an example of how social media is being used by kids everyday.  Not using it in our schools and classrooms seems to be something that educators really need to look at and consider.

Check it out at the following address: http://www.jelli.net/landing/